Articles from July 2016

We get what we train for.  If stresses, strains and stimuli are placed upon the body, it'll generally find ways to respond or adapt.  The SAID Principle states “the demands placed on the body dictate the type of adaptation that will occur”. So the type of stimulus applied during exercise will determine the physiological response and adaptation. For example, lifting heavy weights will improve motor unit recruitment (how the brain uses muscle fibers) and stimulate muscle growth resulting in strength gains.Another example is how doing cardio-respiratory or aerobic work will improve..
Lifting Lighter Weights Can Be As Effective As Lifting Heavier
Traditional weight training style - for real growth in strength - has been to have us ascertain our 1 -rep maximum, and then have us gradually build to lifting eight or more of that weight with good form. We've known for some time that this is not the only way.  It's just as effective lifting a lighter weight for a greater number of repetitions.  The main thing is to tire the muscle.  The theme of this approach has been around for a while; the idea of time-under-tension being the critical thing rather than absolute weight, has long been promoted.  But this study from t..
(This is from Ben Radding at Men’sFitness.com)Your rotator cuff is important (and injuring it means a long recovery), so learn how to keep it safe when you lift.Unlike some sports injuries, you don’t need to suffer one big blow to do serious damage to your shoulders. Stressing this part of the body every time you hit the gym is enough to break down soft tissue over time, and cause the type of intense pain that keeps you off the bench for weeks. But don’t get scared and stop lifting, just lift smarter. We asked CJ Murphy, trainer and owner of Total Performance Sports, for his advice on avoiding..
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